Previous Next

Coding Style

PHP Code Demarcation

PHP code must always be delimited by the full-form, standard PHP tags:

Short tags are never allowed. For files containing only PHP code, the closing tag must always be omitted (See General standards).

Strings

String Literals

When a string is literal (contains no variable substitutions), the apostrophe or "single quote" should always be used to demarcate the string:

$a = 'Example String';

String Literals Containing Apostrophes

When a literal string itself contains apostrophes, it is permitted to demarcate the string with quotation marks or "double quotes". This is especially useful for SQL statements:

$sql = "SELECT `id`, `name` from `people` "
     . "WHERE `name`='Fred' OR `name`='Susan'";

This syntax is preferred over escaping apostrophes as it is much easier to read.

Variable Substitution

Variable substitution is permitted using either of these forms:

$greeting = "Hello $name, welcome back!";

$greeting = "Hello {$name}, welcome back!";

For consistency, this form is not permitted:

$greeting = "Hello ${name}, welcome back!";

String Concatenation

Strings must be concatenated using the "." operator. A space must always be added before and after the "." operator to improve readability:

$company = 'Zend' . ' ' . 'Technologies';

When concatenating strings with the "." operator, it is encouraged to break the statement into multiple lines to improve readability. In these cases, each successive line should be padded with white space such that the "."; operator is aligned under the "=" operator:

$sql = "SELECT `id`, `name` FROM `people` "
     . "WHERE `name` = 'Susan' "
     . "ORDER BY `name` ASC ";

Arrays

Numerically Indexed Arrays

Negative numbers are not permitted as indices.

An indexed array may start with any non-negative number, however all base indices besides 0 are discouraged.

When declaring indexed arrays with the Array function, a trailing space must be added after each comma delimiter to improve readability:

$sampleArray = array(1, 2, 3, 'Zend', 'Studio');

It is permitted to declare multi-line indexed arrays using the "array" construct. In this case, each successive line must be padded with spaces such that beginning of each line is aligned:

$sampleArray = array(1, 2, 3, 'Zend', 'Studio',
                     $a, $b, $c,
                     56.44, $d, 500);

Alternately, the initial array item may begin on the following line. If so, it should be padded at one indentation level greater than the line containing the array declaration, and all successive lines should have the same indentation; the closing paren should be on a line by itself at the same indentation level as the line containing the array declaration:

$sampleArray = array(
    1, 2, 3, 'Zend', 'Studio',
    $a, $b, $c,
    56.44, $d, 500,
);

When using this latter declaration, we encourage using a trailing comma for the last item in the array; this minimizes the impact of adding new items on successive lines, and helps to ensure no parse errors occur due to a missing comma.

Associative Arrays

When declaring associative arrays with the Array construct, breaking the statement into multiple lines is encouraged. In this case, each successive line must be padded with white space such that both the keys and the values are aligned:

$sampleArray = array('firstKey'  => 'firstValue',
                     'secondKey' => 'secondValue');

Alternately, the initial array item may begin on the following line. If so, it should be padded at one indentation level greater than the line containing the array declaration, and all successive lines should have the same indentation; the closing paren should be on a line by itself at the same indentation level as the line containing the array declaration. For readability, the various "=>" assignment operators should be padded such that they align.

$sampleArray = array(
    'firstKey'  => 'firstValue',
    'secondKey' => 'secondValue',
);

When using this latter declaration, we encourage using a trailing comma for the last item in the array; this minimizes the impact of adding new items on successive lines, and helps to ensure no parse errors occur due to a missing comma.

Classes

Class Declaration

Classes must be named according to Zend Framework's naming conventions.

The brace should always be written on the line underneath the class name.

Every class must have a documentation block that conforms to the PHPDocumentor standard.

All code in a class must be indented with four spaces.

Only one class is permitted in each PHP file.

Placing additional code in class files is permitted but discouraged. In such files, two blank lines must separate the class from any additional PHP code in the class file.

The following is an example of an acceptable class declaration:

/**
 * Documentation Block Here
 */
class SampleClass
{
    // all contents of class
    // must be indented four spaces
}

Classes that extend other classes or which implement interfaces should declare their dependencies on the same line when possible.

class SampleClass extends FooAbstract implements BarInterface
{
}

If as a result of such declarations, the line length exceeds the maximum line length, break the line before the "extends" and/or "implements" keywords, and pad those lines by one indentation level.

class SampleClass
    extends FooAbstract
    implements BarInterface
{
}

If the class implements multiple interfaces and the declaration exceeds the maximum line length, break after each comma separating the interfaces, and indent the interface names such that they align.

class SampleClass
    implements BarInterface,
               BazInterface
{
}

Class Member Variables

Member variables must be named according to Zend Framework's variable naming conventions.

Any variables declared in a class must be listed at the top of the class, above the declaration of any methods.

The var construct is not permitted. Member variables always declare their visibility by using one of the private, protected, or public modifiers. Giving access to member variables directly by declaring them as public is permitted but discouraged in favor of accessor methods (set & get).

Functions and Methods

Function and Method Declaration

Functions must be named according to Zend Framework's function naming conventions.

Methods inside classes must always declare their visibility by using one of the private, protected, or public modifiers.

As with classes, the brace should always be written on the line underneath the function name. Space between the function name and the opening parenthesis for the arguments is not permitted.

Functions in the global scope are strongly discouraged.

The following is an example of an acceptable function declaration in a class:

/**
 * Documentation Block Here
 */
class Foo
{
    /**
     * Documentation Block Here
     */
    public function bar()
    {
        // all contents of function
        // must be indented four spaces
    }
}

In cases where the argument list exceeds the maximum line length, you may introduce line breaks. Additional arguments to the function or method must be indented one additional level beyond the function or method declaration. A line break should then occur before the closing argument paren, which should then be placed on the same line as the opening brace of the function or method with one space separating the two, and at the same indentation level as the function or method declaration. The following is an example of one such situation:

/**
 * Documentation Block Here
 */
class Foo
{
    /**
     * Documentation Block Here
     */
    public function bar($arg1, $arg2, $arg3,
        $arg4, $arg5, $arg6
    ) {
        // all contents of function
        // must be indented four spaces
    }
}

Note:

Pass-by-reference is the only parameter passing mechanism permitted in a method declaration.

/**
 * Documentation Block Here
 */
class Foo
{
    /**
     * Documentation Block Here
     */
    public function bar(&$baz)
    {}
}

Call-time pass-by-reference is strictly prohibited.

The return value must not be enclosed in parentheses. This can hinder readability, in additional to breaking code if a method is later changed to return by reference.

/**
 * Documentation Block Here
 */
class Foo
{
    /**
     * WRONG
     */
    public function bar()
    {
        return($this->bar);
    }

    /**
     * RIGHT
     */
    public function bar()
    {
        return $this->bar;
    }
}

Function and Method Usage

Function arguments should be separated by a single trailing space after the comma delimiter. The following is an example of an acceptable invocation of a function that takes three arguments:

threeArguments(1, 2, 3);

Call-time pass-by-reference is strictly prohibited. See the function declarations section for the proper way to pass function arguments by-reference.

In passing arrays as arguments to a function, the function call may include the "array" hint and may be split into multiple lines to improve readability. In such cases, the normal guidelines for writing arrays still apply:

threeArguments(array(1, 2, 3), 2, 3);

threeArguments(array(1, 2, 3, 'Zend', 'Studio',
                     $a, $b, $c,
                     56.44, $d, 500), 2, 3);

threeArguments(array(
    1, 2, 3, 'Zend', 'Studio',
    $a, $b, $c,
    56.44, $d, 500
), 2, 3);

Control Statements

If/Else/Elseif

Control statements based on the if and elseif constructs must have a single space before the opening parenthesis of the conditional and a single space after the closing parenthesis.

Within the conditional statements between the parentheses, operators must be separated by spaces for readability. Inner parentheses are encouraged to improve logical grouping for larger conditional expressions.

The opening brace is written on the same line as the conditional statement. The closing brace is always written on its own line. Any content within the braces must be indented using four spaces.

if ($a != 2) {
    $a = 2;
}

If the conditional statement causes the line length to exceed the maximum line length and has several clauses, you may break the conditional into multiple lines. In such a case, break the line prior to a logic operator, and pad the line such that it aligns under the first character of the conditional clause. The closing paren in the conditional will then be placed on a line with the opening brace, with one space separating the two, at an indentation level equivalent to the opening control statement.

if (($a == $b)
    && ($b == $c)
    || (Foo::CONST == $d)
) {
    $a = $d;
}

The intention of this latter declaration format is to prevent issues when adding or removing clauses from the conditional during later revisions.

For "if" statements that include "elseif" or "else", the formatting conventions are similar to the "if" construct. The following examples demonstrate proper formatting for "if" statements with "else" and/or "elseif" constructs:

if ($a != 2) {
    $a = 2;
} else {
    $a = 7;
}

if ($a != 2) {
    $a = 2;
} elseif ($a == 3) {
    $a = 4;
} else {
    $a = 7;
}

if (($a == $b)
    && ($b == $c)
    || (Foo::CONST == $d)
) {
    $a = $d;
} elseif (($a != $b)
          || ($b != $c)
) {
    $a = $c;
} else {
    $a = $b;
}

PHP allows statements to be written without braces in some circumstances. This coding standard makes no differentiation- all "if", "elseif" or "else" statements must use braces.

Switch

Control statements written with the "switch" statement must have a single space before the opening parenthesis of the conditional statement and after the closing parenthesis.

All content within the "switch" statement must be indented using four spaces. Content under each "case" statement must be indented using an additional four spaces.

switch ($numPeople) {
    case 1:
        break;

    case 2:
        break;

    default:
        break;
}

The construct default should never be omitted from a switch statement.

Note:

It is sometimes useful to write a case statement which falls through to the next case by not including a break or return within that case. To distinguish these cases from bugs, any case statement where break or return are omitted should contain a comment indicating that the break was intentionally omitted.

Inline Documentation

Documentation Format

All documentation blocks ("docblocks") must be compatible with the phpDocumentor format. Describing the phpDocumentor format is beyond the scope of this document. For more information, visit: » http://phpdoc.org/

All class files must contain a "file-level" docblock at the top of each file and a "class-level" docblock immediately above each class. Examples of such docblocks can be found below.

Files

Every file that contains PHP code must have a docblock at the top of the file that contains these phpDocumentor tags at a minimum:

/**
 * Short description for file
 *
 * Long description for file (if any)...
 *
 * LICENSE: Some license information
 *
 * @category   Zend
 * @package    Zend_Magic
 * @subpackage Wand
 * @copyright  Copyright (c) 2005-2011 Zend Technologies USA Inc. (http://www.zend.com)
 * @license    http://framework.zend.com/license   BSD License
 * @version    $Id:$
 * @link       http://framework.zend.com/package/PackageName
 * @since      File available since Release 1.5.0
*/

The @category annotation must have a value of "Zend".

The @package annotation must be assigned, and should be equivalent to the component name of the class contained in the file; typically, this will only have two segments, the "Zend" prefix, and the component name.

The @subpackage annotation is optional. If provided, it should be the subcomponent name, minus the class prefix. In the example above, the assumption is that the class in the file is either "Zend_Magic_Wand", or uses that classname as part of its prefix.

Classes

Every class must have a docblock that contains these phpDocumentor tags at a minimum:

/**
 * Short description for class
 *
 * Long description for class (if any)...
 *
 * @category   Zend
 * @package    Zend_Magic
 * @subpackage Wand
 * @copyright  Copyright (c) 2005-2011 Zend Technologies USA Inc. (http://www.zend.com)
 * @license    http://framework.zend.com/license   BSD License
 * @version    Release: @package_version@
 * @link       http://framework.zend.com/package/PackageName
 * @since      Class available since Release 1.5.0
 * @deprecated Class deprecated in Release 2.0.0
 */

The @category annotation must have a value of "Zend".

The @package annotation must be assigned, and should be equivalent to the component to which the class belongs; typically, this will only have two segments, the "Zend" prefix, and the component name.

The @subpackage annotation is optional. If provided, it should be the subcomponent name, minus the class prefix. In the example above, the assumption is that the class described is either "Zend_Magic_Wand", or uses that classname as part of its prefix.

Functions

Every function, including object methods, must have a docblock that contains at a minimum:

  • A description of the function

  • All of the arguments

  • All of the possible return values

It is not necessary to use the "@access" tag because the access level is already known from the "public", "private", or "protected" modifier used to declare the function.

If a function or method may throw an exception, use @throws for all known exception classes:

@throws exceptionclass [description]
Previous Next
Introduction to Zend Framework
Overview
Installation
Learning Zend Framework
Zend Framework Quick Start
Zend Framework & MVC Introduction
Create Your Project
Create A Layout
Create a Model and Database Table
Create A Form
Congratulations!
Autoloading in Zend Framework
Introduction
Goals and Design
Basic Autoloader Usage
Resource Autoloading
Conclusion
Plugins in Zend Framework
Introduction
Using Plugins
Conclusion
Getting Started with Zend_Layout
Introduction
Using Zend_Layout
Zend_Layout: Conclusions
Getting Started Zend_View Placeholders
Introduction
Basic Placeholder Usage
Standard Placeholders
View Placeholders: Conclusion
Understanding and Using Zend Form Decorators
Introduction
Decorator Basics
Layering Decorators
Rendering Individual Decorators
Creating and Rendering Composite Elements
Conclusion
Getting Started with Zend_Session, Zend_Auth, and Zend_Acl
Building Multi-User Applications With Zend Framework
Managing User Sessions In ZF
Authenticating Users in Zend Framework
Building an Authorization System in Zend Framework
Getting Started with Zend_Search_Lucene
Zend_Search_Lucene Introduction
Lucene Index Structure
Index Opening and Creation
Indexing
Searching
Supported queries
Search result pagination
Getting Started with Zend_Paginator
Introduction
Simple Examples
Pagination Control and ScrollingStyles
Putting it all Together
Zend Framework Reference
Zend_Acl
Introduction
Refining Access Controls
Advanced Usage
Zend_Amf
Introduction
Zend_Amf_Server
Zend_Application
Introduction
Zend_Application Quick Start
Theory of Operation
Examples
Core Functionality
Available Resource Plugins
Zend_Auth
Introduction
Database Table Authentication
Digest Authentication
HTTP Authentication Adapter
LDAP Authentication
Open ID Authentication
Zend_Barcode
Introduction
Barcode creation using Zend_Barcode class
Zend_Barcode Objects
Zend_Barcode Renderers
Zend_Cache
Introduction
The Theory of Caching
Zend_Cache Frontends
Zend_Cache Backends
The Cache Manager
Zend_Captcha
Introduction
Captcha Operation
CAPTCHA Adapters
SimpleCloud API: Zend_Cloud
Document Service Introduction
Queue Service Introduction
StorageService Introduction
Zend_CodeGenerator
Introduction
Zend_CodeGenerator Examples
Zend_CodeGenerator Reference
Zend_Config
Introduction
Theory of Operation
Zend_Config_Ini
Zend_Config_Json
Zend_Config_Xml
Zend_Config_Yaml
Zend_Config_Writer
Zend_Config_Writer
Zend_Console_Getopt
Introduction
Declaring Getopt Rules
Fetching Options and Arguments
Configuring Zend_Console_Getopt
Zend_Controller
Zend_Controller Quick Start
Zend_Controller Basics
The Front Controller
The Request Object
The Standard Router
The Dispatcher
Action Controllers
Action Helpers
The Response Object
Plugins
Using a Conventional Modular Directory Structure
MVC Exceptions
Zend_Currency
Introduction to Zend_Currency
Using Zend_Currency
Options for currencies
What makes a currency?
Where is the currency?
How does the currency look like?
How much is my currency?
Calculating with currencies
Exchanging currencies
Additional informations on Zend_Currency
Zend_Date
Introduction
Theory of Operation
Basic Methods
Zend_Date API Overview
Creation of Dates
Constants for General Date Functions
Working Examples
Zend_Db
Zend_Db_Adapter
Zend_Db_Statement
Zend_Db_Profiler
Zend_Db_Select
Zend_Db_Table
Zend_Db_Table_Row
Zend_Db_Table_Rowset
Zend_Db_Table Relationships
Zend_Db_Table_Definition
Zend_Debug
Dumping Variables
Zend_Dojo
Introduction
Zend_Dojo_Data: dojo.data Envelopes
Dojo View Helpers
Dojo Form Elements and Decorators
Zend_Dojo build layer support
Zend_Dom
Introduction
Zend_Dom_Query
Zend_Exception
Using Exceptions
Basic usage
Previous Exceptions
Zend_Feed
Introduction
Importing Feeds
Retrieving Feeds from Web Pages
Consuming an RSS Feed
Consuming an Atom Feed
Consuming a Single Atom Entry
Modifying Feed and Entry structures
Custom Feed and Entry Classes
Zend_Feed_Reader
Zend_Feed_Writer
Zend_Feed_Pubsubhubbub
Zend_File
Zend_File_Transfer
Validators for Zend_File_Transfer
Filters for Zend_File_Transfer
Zend_Filter
Introduction
Standard Filter Classes
Filter Chains
Writing Filters
Zend_Filter_Input
Zend_Filter_Inflector
Zend_Form
Zend_Form
Zend_Form Quick Start
Creating Form Elements Using Zend_Form_Element
Creating Forms Using Zend_Form
Creating Custom Form Markup Using Zend_Form_Decorator
Standard Form Elements Shipped With Zend Framework
Standard Form Decorators Shipped With Zend Framework
Internationalization of Zend_Form
Advanced Zend_Form Usage
Zend_Gdata
Introduction
Authenticating with AuthSub
Using the Book Search Data API
Authenticating with ClientLogin
Using Google Calendar
Using Google Documents List Data API
Using Google Health
Using Google Spreadsheets
Using Google Apps Provisioning
Using Google Base
Using Picasa Web Albums
Using the YouTube Data API
Catching Gdata Exceptions
Zend_Http
Introduction
Zend_Http_Client - Advanced Usage
Zend_Http_Client - Connection Adapters
Zend_Http_Cookie and Zend_Http_CookieJar
Zend_Http_Response
Zend_Http_UserAgent
The UserAgent Device Interface
The UserAgent Features Adapter
The WURFL UserAgent Features Adapter
The DeviceAtlas UserAgent Features Adapter
The TeraWurfl UserAgent Features Adapter
The UserAgent Storage Interface
The Session UserAgent Storage Adapter
Zend_InfoCard
Introduction
Zend_Json
Introduction
Basic Usage
Advanced Usage of Zend_Json
XML to JSON conversion
Zend_Json_Server - JSON-RPC server
Zend_Layout
Introduction
Zend_Layout Quick Start
Zend_Layout Configuration Options
Zend_Layout Advanced Usage
Zend_Ldap
Introduction
API overview
Usage Scenarios
Tools
Object oriented access to the LDAP tree using Zend_Ldap_Node
Getting information from the LDAP server
Serializing LDAP data to and from LDIF
Zend_Loader
Loading Files and Classes Dynamically
The Autoloader
Resource Autoloaders
Loading Plugins
Zend_Locale
Introduction
Using Zend_Locale
Normalization and Localization
Working with Dates and Times
Supported locales
Zend_Log
Overview
Writers
Formatters
Filters
Using the Factory to Create a Log
Zend_Mail
Introduction
Sending via SMTP
Sending Multiple Mails per SMTP Connection
Using Different Transports
HTML E-Mail
Attachments
Adding Recipients
Controlling the MIME Boundary
Additional Headers
Character Sets
Encoding
SMTP Authentication
Securing SMTP Transport
Reading Mail Messages
Zend_Markup
Introduction
Getting Started With Zend_Markup
Zend_Markup Parsers
Zend_Markup Renderers
Zend_Measure
Introduction
Creation of Measurements
Outputting measurements
Manipulating Measurements
Types of measurements
Zend_Memory
Overview
Memory Manager
Memory Objects
Zend_Mime
Zend_Mime
Zend_Mime_Message
Zend_Mime_Part
Zend_Navigation
Introduction
Pages
Containers
Zend_Oauth
Introduction to OAuth
Zend_OpenId
Introduction
Zend_OpenId_Consumer Basics
Zend_OpenId_Provider
Zend_Paginator
Introduction
Usage
Configuration
Advanced usage
Zend_Pdf
Introduction
Creating and Loading PDF Documents
Save Changes to PDF Documents
Working with Pages
Drawing
Interactive Features
Document Info and Metadata
Zend_Pdf module usage example
Zend_ProgressBar
Zend_ProgressBar
Zend_Queue
Introduction
Example usage
Framework
Adapters
Customizing Zend_Queue
Stomp
Zend_Reflection
Introduction
Zend_Reflection Examples
Zend_Reflection Reference
Zend_Registry
Using the Registry
Zend_Rest
Introduction
Zend_Rest_Client
Zend_Rest_Server
Zend_Search_Lucene
Overview
Building Indexes
Searching an Index
Query Language
Query Construction API
Character Set
Extensibility
Interoperating with Java Lucene
Advanced
Best Practices
Zend_Serializer
Introduction
Zend_Serializer_Adapter
Zend_Server
Introduction
Zend_Server_Reflection
Zend_Service
Introduction
Zend_Service_Akismet
Zend_Service_Amazon
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Instances
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Windows Instances
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Reserved Instances
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: CloudWatch Monitoring
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Amazon Machine Images (AMI)
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Elastic Block Storage (EBS)
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Elastic IP Addresses
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Keypairs
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Regions and Availability Zones
Zend_Service_Amazon_Ec2: Security Groups
Zend_Service_Amazon_S3
Zend_Service_Amazon_Sqs
Zend_Service_Audioscrobbler
Zend_Service_Delicious
Zend_Service_DeveloperGarden
Zend_Service_Ebay
Zend_Service_Ebay_Finding
Zend_Service_Flickr
Zend_Service_LiveDocx
Zend_Service_Nirvanix
Zend_Service_ReCaptcha
Zend_Service_ShortUrl
Zend_Service_Simpy
Zend_Service_SlideShare
Zend_Service_StrikeIron
Zend_Service_StrikeIron: Bundled Services
Zend_Service_StrikeIron: Advanced Uses
Zend_Service_Technorati
Zend_Service_Twitter
Zend_Service_WindowsAzure
Zend_Service_WindowsAzure_Storage_Blob
Zend_Service_WindowsAzure_Diagnostics_Manager
Zend_Service_WindowsAzure_Storage_Queue
Zend_Service_WindowsAzure_Storage_Table
Zend_Service_Yahoo
Zend_Session
Introduction
Basic Usage
Advanced Usage
Global Session Management
Zend_Session_SaveHandler_DbTable
Zend_Soap
Zend_Soap_Server
Zend_Soap_Client
WSDL Accessor
AutoDiscovery
Zend_Tag
Introduction
Zend_Tag_Cloud
Zend_Test
Introduction
Zend_Test_PHPUnit
Zend_Test_PHPUnit_Db
Zend_Text
Zend_Text_Figlet
Zend_Text_Table
Zend_TimeSync
Introduction
Working with Zend_TimeSync
Zend_Tool
Using Zend_Tool On The Command Line
Extending Zend_Tool
Zend_Tool_Framework
Introduction
Using the CLI Tool
Architecture
Creating Providers to use with Zend_Tool_Framework
Shipped System Providers
Extending and Configuring Zend_Tool_Framework
Zend_Tool_Project
Introduction
Create A Project
Zend_Tool Project Providers
Zend_Tool_Project Internals
Zend_Translate
Introduction
Adapters for Zend_Translate
Using Translation Adapters
Creating source files
Additional features for translation
Plural notations for Translation
Zend_Uri
Zend_Uri
Zend_Validate
Introduction
Standard Validation Classes
Validator Chains
Writing Validators
Validation Messages
Zend_Version
Getting the Zend Framework Version
Zend_View
Introduction
Controller Scripts
View Scripts
View Helpers
Zend_View_Abstract
Zend_Wildfire
Zend_Wildfire
Zend_XmlRpc
Introduction
Zend_XmlRpc_Client
Zend_XmlRpc_Server
ZendX_Console_Process_Unix
ZendX_Console_Process_Unix
ZendX_JQuery
Introduction
ZendX_JQuery View Helpers
ZendX_JQuery Form Elements and Decorators
Zend Framework Requirements
Introduction
Zend Framework Migration Notes
Zend Framework 1.10
Zend Framework 1.9
Zend Framework 1.8
Zend Framework 1.7
Zend Framework 1.6
Zend Framework 1.5
Zend Framework 1.0
Zend Framework 0.9
Zend Framework 0.8
Zend Framework 0.6
Zend Framework Coding Standard for PHP
Overview
PHP File Formatting
Naming Conventions
Coding Style
Zend Framework Documentation Standard
Overview
Documentation File Formatting
Recommendations
Recommended Project Structure for Zend Framework MVC Applications
Overview
Recommended Project Directory Structure
Module Structure
Rewrite Configuration Guide
Zend Framework Performance Guide
Introduction
Class Loading
Zend_Db Performance
Internationalization (i18n) and Localization (l10n)
View Rendering
Copyright Information